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USS Amsterdam (CL-59)

USS Amsterdam (CL-59)


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The USS Amsterdam (CL-59) was laid down as a Cleveland class light cruiser on 1 May 1941 at the Camden shipyards of the New York Shipbuilding Corps. In the emergency caused by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor it was decided to turn a number of the unfinished Cleveland hulls into light aircraft carriers. On 12 February 1942 the Amsterdam was renamed as the Independence (CVL-22), becoming the name ship of the Independence class of carriers. She was launched as a carrier on 22 August 1942 and commissioned on 1 January 1943. The name Amsterdam was then reused on the Cleveland class cruiser CL-101.


USS Amsterdam (CL 101)

Named after the city in the state of New York, the USS AMSTERDAM was one of the CLEVELAND - class light cruisers. Decommissioned at the end of June 1947, the AMSTERDAM spent well over two decades in the Pacific Reserve Fleet. She was stricken from the Navy list in January 1971 and sold for scrapping in February 1972.

General Characteristics: Awarded: 1941
Keel laid: March 3, 1943
Launched: April 25, 1944
Commissioned: January 8, 1945
Decommissioned: June 30, 1947
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Va.
Propulsion system: geared turbines, 100,000 shp
Propellers: four
Length: 610.2 feet (186 meters)
Beam: 66.3 feet (20.2 meters)
Draft: 24.6 feet (7.5 meters)
Displacement: approx. 14,130 tons fully loaded
Speed: 32.5 knots
Aircraft: four
Armament: twelve 15.2cm 6-inch/47 caliber guns in four triple mounts, twelve 12.7cm 5-inch/38 caliber guns in six twin mounts, 28 40mm guns, 10 20mm guns
Crew: 70 officers and 1285 enlisted

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS AMSTERDAM. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

USS AMSTERDAM was laid down on 3 March 1943 at Newport News, Va., by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. launched on 25 April 1944, sponsored by Mrs. William E. Hasenfuss, the first "Gold Star Mother" of Amsterdam, N.Y., who had lost a son in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 and commissioned at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., on 8 January 1945, Capt. Andrew P. Lawton in command.

After final fitting out at Norfolk, the light cruiser got underway on 5 February for shakedown training in the Chesapeake Bay. On 17 February, she stood out from Hampton Roads and headed south for Trinidad, British West Indies, and the second phase of her shakedown cruise. AMSTERDAM operated from Trinidad through 13 March, when she set a course for Norfolk. During the return voyage, she held shore bombardment practice off the island of Culebra and then arrived back at Norfolk on the 20th. Following a short cruise to Cape May, N.J., for gunnery exercises, the ship entered the Norfolk Navy Yard on 24 March for availability.

AMSTERDAM left the yard on 20 April for training exercises in Chesapeake Bay and, four days later, sailed for the Caribbean. She held training exercises off Culebra and at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and then proceeded to the Panama Canal which she transited on 5 May. The warship reached Pearl Harbor on 18 May and, during her stay in Hawaiian waters, carried out numerous gunnery and tactical exercises.

On 9 June, the cruiser set a course for Leyte, Philippine Islands. Upon her arrival in San Pedro Bay on the 21st, she reported to the 3rd Fleet for duty. After a period of provisioning and refueling, the ship sortied on 1 July with Task Force (TF) 38 to cover air strikes against the Japanese home islands. On 10 July, the force's planes began a series of raids on Japanese airfields, factories, and shipping. During these actions, AMSTERDAM protected the carriers from attack by enemy air and surface forces. Among the cities the task force attacked were Tokyo, Kure, Kobe, and Osaka. On 15 August, TF 38 was preparing to launch another attack on Tokyo when its ships received word of Japan's capitulation.

During the next few weeks, AMSTERDAM remained in waters off the east coast of Honshu guarding against possible Japanese aggression during armistice negotiations. She steamed into Tokyo Bay on 5 September and remained there through the 20th and then shaped a course for the United States. After brief layovers at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, and Pearl Harbor to take on personnel for transportation to the United States, the cruiser arrived at Portland, Oreg., on 15 October and remained at that port for a fortnight to participate in Navy Day ceremonies. On the 29th, she got underway for San Pedro, Calif.

The ship reached San Pedro on 1 November. After a period of leave and upkeep, the cruiser left the west coast on 19 November bound for Pearl Harbor. She touched there on the 25th and took on personnel and equipment for transportation to the west coast. The cruiser set sail again on 12 December, arrived back at San Pedro on the 18th, and rode at anchor there into early 1946. On 21 January, she got underway for San Francisco. Shortly after her arrival, her crew began work to prepare the ship for inactivation and entry into the Pacific Reserve Fleet. She was decommissioned on 30 June 1947 and was laid up at San Francisco. AMSTERDAM's name was struck from the Navy list on 2 January 1971, and the vessel was sold on 11 February 1972 to National Metal & Steel Corp., Terminal Island, Calif., and later scrapped.


USS Amsterdam (CL-59) - History

10,662 Tons (standard)
14,751 Tons (loaded)
623' x 71.5' x 24.3'
26 x 40mm AA guns

30 Aircraft including
9 x Dive Bombers
9 x Torpedo Bombers
12 x Fighters

Ship History
Built by New York Shipbuilding Corporation in Camden, NJ. Laid down May 1, 1941 as a light cruiser USS Amsterdam CL-59. Launched August 22, 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Dorothy Warner, wife of Rawleigh Warner. Commissioned January 14, 1943 into the U.S. Navy (USN) as USS Independence (CVL-22) as the first light carrier of the Independence Class Light Carrier with Captain G. R. Fairlamb, Jr., in command.

Independence conducted a shakedown cruise and training in the Caribbean then via Panama Canal to San Francisco arriving on July 3, 1943 then departed for Pearl Harbor arriving July 14, 1943. The next day redesignated CVL-22 and conducted training exercises with USS Essex (CV-9) and USS Yorktown (CV-10).

Wartime History
Departed for a raids against Japanese occupied islands in the Central Pacific. On September 1, 1943 her carrier aircraft attacked Marcus Island. On October 5-6, 1943 her aircraft attacked Wake Island.

On September 24, 1944 refueled at sea by USS Mississinewa (AO-59) receiving the equivalent of 4,857 barrels of fuel.

Postwar
Independence was moored at San Francisco and was used to study decontamination until the carrier's age and risk of sinking resulted in the decision for her to be scuttled.

Sinking History
On January 26, 1951 towed from San Francisco and scuttled off Farallon Islands at at approximately Lat 37°30′00″N Long 123°05′00″W .

Shipwreck
During 2009, Independence was located upright with a slight list to starboard and most of the flight deck intact, although there are gaping holes leading to the hangar deck below on the sea floor at a depth of 2,600' (790m) off the Farallon Islands in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

During March 2015, scientists and technicians from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) embarked aboard the sanctuary vessel RV Fulmar used the autonomous underwater vehicle Echo Ranger to make a survey of the wreck, employing the echoscope three-dimensional imaging sonar to make a series of images of it. What appears to be an airplane on the hangar deck is visible through the forward aircraft elevator hatch. No signs of radioactive contamination were detected, and a NOAA spokesman described the wreck as "amazingly intact."

During 2016, a team from the Ocean Exploration Trust and and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) led by Robert Ballard used robotic exploration vehicles (ROVs) to make a closer inspection and survey of the shipwreck while streaming the footage online. During their survey, they located at least one F6F Hellcat inside the hanger and documented anti-aircraft guns aboard.

References
Dive Training "50 Years After Sinking, Aircraft Carrier 'Amazingly Intact'" June 2015 page 18
NOAA Sanctuaries USS Independence

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Renaming US Navy Ships

The nation-wide movement to remove names that honor or glorify the Confederate cause is an issue confronting the US military not just in the public eye but also in the halls of Congress. The Senate Armed Services Committee, in its June 11 markup of the Fiscal Year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act, inserted a provision:

“Establishing a commission to study and provide recommendations concerning the removal, names, symbols, displays, monuments, and paraphernalia that honor or commemorate the Confederate States of America, addressing an implementation plan, cost, and criteria for renaming, among other procedures. The implementation plan is to be implemented three years after enactment.”

The brow of the cruiser USS CHANCELLORSVILLE proclaims the ship’s motto, “Press On,” part of a directive from Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee after his deputy Gen. Stonewall Jackson was wounded during the Battle of Chancellorsville in 1863. The painting of Lee and Jackson, photographed in 2016, is displayed in the cruiser’s wardroom. (Chris Cavas)

The Republican-led committee adopted the overall bill with a bipartisan vote of 25-2, and the measure now heads to the Senate floor for consideration. To become law it still needs to be adopted by the whole Senate, survive into the House-Senate NDAA conference bill and then signed by the president.

At immediate issue are ten US Army bases named for Confederate officers, as well as the cruiser USS CHANCELLORSVILLE (CG 62), which memorializes a land battle considered to be a Confederate victory, and USNS MAURY (T-AGS 66), a survey ship that honors Commander Matthew Fontaine Maury, the first superintendent of the US Naval Observatory and who gained worldwide fame as an oceanographer for the US Navy. Maury also served in the Confederate Navy, but since 1918 four US Navy ships have carried his name.

The Navy generally refrains from renaming its ships once they’ve entered service. Politics and social mores certainly play a part in choosing the names of new ships, and it is not unusual for a ship to be renamed one or more times prior to entering service, but it would be quite unusual for ships to be renamed in service due to changing sensitivities.

Renamings usually take place because of an imperative to quickly honor a person or event. They can also accompany a change in function such as converting a ship to a different purpose or because a naming scheme for a certain class of ships might change. Other changes might be for stylistic or administrative reasons and in those cases the core names are retained even if the rendering changes. Prior to construction names have often been swapped among ships of a class for a variety of reasons, including the symbolism of building a particularly-named ship in a particular state or city.

Ships acquired from private or other sources have also frequently been renamed, especially ships transferred from the US Army or US Coast Guard to naval service. Hundreds of ships transferred from other government agencies such as the Maritime Commission or the Maritime Administration have been renamed upon being acquired for US Navy service.

During World War Two new ships were often renamed for ships lost in combat or for other reasons. To perpetuate or commemorate the names faster the practice was to make the name changes to ships nearing completion rather than on new ships yet to be built.

Looking back over the past 120 years or so, here are some examples of name changes. Many of these instances involve types of ships or naming schemes long since discarded by the Navy. There are many more cases of name changes, far too many to list here.

The examples listed below use hull number designations to indicate a specific ship, as unlike ship names, hull numbers are almost never reused. The designations indicate a specific function – DD for destroyer, CV for aircraft carrier, for example. Although not always noted, in many cases the original names that were changed were used again on later ships.

And yes, it can get very complicated!

The brow of the cruiser USS CHANCELLORSVILLE proclaims the ship’s motto, “Press On,” part of a directive from Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee after his deputy Gen. Stonewall Jackson was wounded during the Battle of Chancellorsville in 1863. The painting of Lee and Jackson, photographed in 2016, is displayed in the cruiser’s wardroom. (Chris Cavas)

Changes due to ships lost in combat

  • Aircraft carrier USS BON HOMME RICHARD (CV 10) was renamed YORKTOWN in September 1942, prior to launch, to perpetuate the name of YORKTOWN (CV 5) lost in June 1942 during the Battle of Midway. Subsequently CV 31 was named BON HOMME RICHARD. Similarly, KEARSARGE (CV 12) became HORNET CABOT (CV 16) became LEXINGTON, ORISKANY (CV 18) became WASP and VALLEY FORGE (CV 37) became PRINCETON.
  • Heavy cruiser USS PITTSBURGH (CA 70) was renamed CANBERRA in October 1942 prior to launch to perpetuate the name of an Australian heavy cruiser sunk fighting with US forces during the Solomons campaign. A few weeks later the cruiser ALBANY (CA 72) was renamed PITTSBURGH prior to construction. The names of most of the US cruisers and destroyers lost in the same Solomons campaign were also quickly reused.
  • Nine light cruisers of the CLEVELAND (CL 55) class were re-ordered in 1942 as light aircraft carriers. All lost their original “city” names – applied to cruisers — for traditional aircraft carrier names, a naming scheme which at the time included famous ships of the past and famous battles. For example, USS AMSTERDAM (CL 59) became USS INDEPENDENCE (CVL 22).

Change in naming scheme

  • In the early 20 th century armored cruisers were named for states, as were battleships. The naming scheme was changed during the 19-teens and all cruisers gained city names to free up the state names for new battleships. So, for example, USS CALIFORNIA (Armored Cruiser No. 6) became USS SAN DIEGO.
  • During the course of World War Two it was decided to change the naming convention for escort carriers from bodies of water to battles. USS CHAPIN BAY (CVE 63), for example, became MIDWAY prior to launch in April 1943 to honor the sea battle. In September 1944 she was renamed SAINT LO as it was felt the name of the Midway battle was better suited to the new large aircraft carrier CV 41 then building. A month after the renaming, USS SAINT LO was sunk in combat during the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Change in function

  • The collier USS JUPITER (Fleet Collier No. 3) was converted in 1920 to become an aircraft carrier and renamed LANGLEY to honor an early aviation pioneer.
  • USS CHICAGO (Armored Cruiser No. 14) was renamed ALTON in 1928 and redesignated IX 5 (miscellaneous auxiliary) after being decommissioned and used as a barracks ship.
  • Escort carrier USS GILBERT ISLANDS (CVE 107) was renamed ANNAPOLIS (AGMR 1) in 1963 during conversion to become a major communications relay ship.
  • Oceanographic research ship THOMAS G. THOMPSON (T-AGOR 9) (first intended to be named SILAS BENT) was renamed PACIFIC ESCORT in 1989 upon conversion to a training support ship (IX 517). She was again renamed GOSPORT in 1997.

Acquired from other sources

  • Hundreds of Lend-Lease ships during World War Two were renamed depending on their status. Many escort aircraft carriers, destroyer escorts and other escort craft changed status and names depending on oft-changing transfer plans to allied navies.
  • Three combat stores ships acquired in the early 1980s from the United Kingdom’s Royal Fleet Auxiliary were renamed upon entering US service: LYNESS became USNS SIRIUS (T-AFS 8), TARBATNESS became USNS SPICA (T-AFS 9) and STROMNESS became USNS SATURN (T-AFS 10).
  • Five of the Spearhead-class Joint High-Speed Vessels of the 2000s were first intended for delivery to the US Army and were given Army names. They were renamed beginning in 2011 after it was decided all the ships would be operated by the Navy’s Military Sealift Command. Additionally all the JHSVs became EPF Expeditionary Fast Transports in September 2015. The ships are CHOCTAW COUNTY (T-EPF 2, ex-VIGILANT), MILLINOCKET (T-EPF 3, ex-FORTITUDE), TRENTON (T-EPF 5, ex-RESOLUTE), CARSON CITY (T-EPF 7, ex-COURAGEOUS) and CITY OF BISMARCK (T-EPF 9, ex-BISMARCK, ex-SACRIFICE). BISMARCK was renamed CITY OF BISMARCK on 19 October 2015 to distinguish the ship named for the city in North Dakota from the chancellor of Imperial Germany.

The name and designation of the submarine USS SCORPION (SSN 598) was changed in 1958 after the design and mission of the ship changed. The submarine was commissioned in 1959 as USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (SSBN 598), first of the famous “Forty-one for Freedom” ballistic missile submarines of the Cold War. Several of those submarines also bore names related to the Confederacy. (US Navy)


USS Amsterdam (CL-59) - History

The Carter Hall (LSD 50) is the second of four Cargo Variant (CV) of the Whidbey Island-class dock landing ships and the second United States ship named for the famous and historical estate in Clarke County, Virginia, built by Nathaniel Burwell in honor of his grandfather Robert "King" Carter. A significant difference between the two variants is that Hall's well deck has been shortened from 440 feet to 180 feet. This provides embarked Marines with added vehicle and cargo storage areas. The well deck can hold two Landing Craft Air Cushions (LCAC) and a variety of landing craft and tracked amphibious assault vehicles. Her two-spot flight deck can land and service any helicopter in the Navy and Marine Corps inventory.

October 2, 1993 The Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Carter Hall was christened and launched during a ceremony at Avondale Industries shipyard in New Orleans, Louisiana. Mrs. Marry Elam Howard, the wife of Mr. J. Daniel Howard, former Under Secretary of the Navy, served as sponsor of the ship. Cmdr. Rand D. LeBouvier is the prospective commanding officer.

September 30, 1995 USS Carter Hall was commissioned during a ceremony at Julia Street Wharf in New Orleans, La.

October 3, The dock landing ship emabrked two LCACs off the coast of Panama City, Fla., for a transport to Little Creek, Virginia Port visit to Key West, Fla., from Oct. 5-10.

October 13, USS Carter Hall arrived in its homeport of Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek after an 18-day transit from Avondale, La.

From Nov. 6-9, the Carter Hall was underway for routine training in the Virginia Capes Op. Area Underway for Combat Systems Ship's Qualification Trials (CSSQT) from Nov. 27- Dec. 1 Underway for local operations from Dec. 4-8.

January 12, 1996 LSD 50 departed homeport for a Shakedown Cruise in the Jacksonville OPAREA and Exuma Sound, Bahamas Inport Naval Station Mayport, Fla., from Jan. 16-17, 19-22, 2?-30th and Feb. 2-7 Port visit to Nassau from Feb. 14-18 Returned to Little Creek on Feb. 20.

From March 6-13, the Carter Hall was in dry-dock at Newport News Shipyard for emergent repairs to the starboard shaft pitch control Underway for self-defense tracking exercise from March 13-14 Underway for final contract trials on March 19 Underway for routine training from April 27- May 3 Underway again from May 7-8.

May 30, USS Carter Hall entered the Metro Machine Shipyard in Norfolk, Va., for a three-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) Underway to Norfolk Naval Shipyard for safe haven from Hurricane Edouard from July 14-16 Underway for sea trials from Aug. 26-27 Underway for magnetic deperming at Lambert's Point, Norfolk on Sept. 3 Mored at Naval Station Norfolk on Sept. 5 for safe haven from Hurricane Fran Returned home on Sept. 8 Underway for amphibious demonstration "Autumn Allies" on Sept. 13 Underway for local operations from Sept. 17-20, Sept. 30- Oct. 6 and Oct. 21-24 Underway for Engineering Certifications (ECERT) from Nov. 12-14 Underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) III and Final Examination Period (FEP) from Dec. 2-6 Underway for PMINT with the 22nd MEU in Onslow Bay, N.C., from Dec. 13-18 Underway for local operations from Jan. 28-30.

From February 4-13, 1997, LSD 50 was underway for USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) Battle Group's COMPTUEX in the Cherry Point Op. Area Underway for JTFEX/SOCEX from March 9-24 Inport Morehead City on March 10 and 22nd Underway for sea trials and general operational checks on April 23.

April 29, USS Carter Hall departed Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek for its maiden Mediterranean deployment, with the USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) Amphibious Ready Group.

On April 30, the dock landing ship arrived off the coast of Morehead City, N.C., to embark elements from 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), including 4 M1A1 tanks.

May 12, The Carter Hall pulled into Naval Station Rota, Spain, for a two-day port call Anchored in Bay of Zahara from May 14-19, in support of exercise Linked Seas.

May 21, USS Carter Hall anchored off Lisbon, Portugal, for a five-day port visit.

May 24, Cmdr. Stanley V. DeGeus relieved Cmdr. Rand D. LeBouvier as CO of the Carter Hall during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

May 28, LSD 50 pulled into Almeria, Spain, for a nine-day tender availability with the USS Simon Lake (AS 33). Before entering the port, USS Carter Hall offloaded the vechiles on the beach in support of exercise Betacom.

June 13, The Carter Hall anchored in Volos Bay, Greece, for a two-day in-port phase of exercise Alexander the Great through June 20.

June 25, The dock landing ship anchored off Cassis, France, for a five-day port visit Inport Toulon, France, from July 1-7 Participated in exercise INVITEX '97 from July 10-17 off the coast of Italy.

July 27, USS Carter Hall anchored off Ibiza, Spain, for an eight-day port visit after participating in exercise Atlas Hinge, off the coast of North Africa Upkeep in Rota with USS Simon Lake from Aug. 11-19.

August 29, LSD 50 pulled into Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a week-long port call Port visit to Barcelona from Sept. 6-13.

September 22, USS Carter Hall anchored off Kyparissia, Greece, for the start of two-week exercise Dynamic Mix.

October 11, The Carter Hall pulled again into Rota, Spain, for a five-day port call to conduct agricultural counter-measure washdowns of all embarked equipment.

October 26, The dock landing ship anchored in Onslow Bay to offload AAVs Inport Morehead City from Oct. 27-28.

October 29, USS Carter Hall returned to homeport after a six-month deployment.

From Dec. 9-16, the Carter Hall was underway for Type Commander's Amphibious Training (TCAT) in the Cherry Point Op. Area.

From April 8-9, 1998, LSD 50 was underway for sea trials Underway again from April 29- May 5 Port visit to Philadelphia, Pa., from May 1-3.

From June 3-20, USS Carter Hall was underway for NATO exercise Cooperative Osprey '98 off the coast of Onslow Beach Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on July 1 Underway for local operations from July 22-23 Underway for routine training from July 27-31 Underway for TSTA I from Aug. 3-6 and 12-17th.

August 25, The Carter Hall emergency sortied from NAB Little Crrek to avoid the Hurricane Bonnie Retured on Aug. 29 Underway for TSTA II from Sept. 1-3 Underway for ECERT from Sept. 8-11 Underway for TCAT, TSTA II and CSTG from Sept. 15-24 Underway for local operations from Oct. 28-29 Underway for TSTA III/FEP from Nov. 2-5.

November 25, Cmdr. Pamela A. Markiewitcz relieved Cmdr. Stanley V. DeGeus as CO of LSD 50 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

From Dec. 1-3, the Carter Hall was underway for deck landing qualifications Underway for local operations from Jan. 19-21, 1999 Underway again on Feb. 4.

February 10, LSD 50 pulled into New Orleans, La., for an eight-day port call Returned home on Feb. 24 Underway for amphibious operations in Onslow Bay from March 22-26, April 5-9 and May 17-22 Underway for local operations from June 1-4.

July 15, USS Carter Hall departed NAB Little Creek for a scheduled deployment in support of annual exercise UNITAS 40 and biennial West African Training Cruise (WATC) Onload at Morehead City, N.C., on July 16 Brief stop in Naval Station Mayport on July 20.

July 25, The dock landing ship pulled into Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, P.R., for a three-day port call Anchored off Cartagena, Colombia, from July 31- Aug. 4.

August 5, USS Carter Hall moored at Vasco Nunez de Balboa naval base (the ex-U.S. Naval Station Rodman) for a two-day port call after transiting Panama Canal Anchored off San Lorenzo, Ecuador, on Aug. 10 Anchored off Manta, Ecuador, from Aug. 15-17 Anchored off Salinas, Ecuador, from Aug. 20-23 Inport Paita, Peru, from Aug. 24-25.

August 27, The Carter Hall pulled into Callao Naval Base for a five-day port visit to Lima, Peru Anchored off ilo, Peru, from Sept. 6-7 Anchored off Coquimbo, Chile, from Sept. 9-11 Anchored off Aldea, Chile, from Sept. 11-15.

September 16, LSD 50 arrived in Valparaiso, Chile, for a four-day port visit Port call to Talcahuano, Chile, from Sept. 21-23 Anchored off Punta Arenas, Chile, from Sept. 27-28 Anchored off Puerto Belgrano, Argentina, due to bad weather from Sept. 30- Oct. 4.

October 7, USS Carter Hall pulled into Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for a five-day port visit Anchored off Marambaia Island from Oct. 12-18 Inport Rio de Janeiro again from Oct. 18-23.

November 4, The Carter Hall arrived in Cape Town, South Africa, for a three-day port visit Port call to Walvis Bay, Namibia, from Nov. 9-13.

November 18, The dock landing ship pulled into Lagos, Nigeria, for a two-day port call Anchored off Accra, Ghana, from Nov. 21-23 Port visit to Abidjan, Ivory Coast, fron Nov. 28-30.

December 8, The Carter Hall pulled into NS Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, for a two-day port call to conduct agricultural washdowns Inport Morehead City on Dec. 14.

December 15, USS Carter Hall returned to Little Creek after a five-month deployment in the U.S. 4th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility.

From Feb. 1-2, 2000, the Carter Hall was underway for local operations Underway for Capabilities Exercise (CAPEX) in Onslow Bay from Feb. 7-11.

February 22, USS Carter Hall entered the Moon Engineering shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a four-month Planned Maintenance Availability (PMA) Underway for sea trials from June 7-9.

June 23, Cmdr. Edward J. Delaney relieved Cmdr. Pamela A. Markiewitcz as CO of the Carter Hall.

From July 10-14, the dock landing ship was underway for CO's Time in the Virginia Capes Op. Area Underway for routine training from July 24-28 Ammo onload at NWS Yorktown from Aug. 23-24 Underway for local operations from Sept. 5-8 and Sept. 14-15 Underway again on Sept. 29.

October 1, USS Carter Hall pulled into Port Everglades, Fla., for a four-day visit to Ft. Lauderdale to participate in Broward County Navy Days.

October 6, LSD 50 moored at Ocean Terminal in Savannah, Ga., for a four-day port visit to participate in Oktoberfest 2000 festivities Returned home on Oct. 16 after participating in TCAT in Onslow Bay Underway for local operations from Oct. 23-27 Underway for FEP from Oct. 30- Nov. 2 Underway for engineering UD on Nov. 27.

November 29, USS Carter Hall arrived in Baltimore, Md., for a five-day port visit in conjunction with the Army-Navy game.

December 15, The Carter Hall returned to homeport after participated in PHIBRON/MEU Integration Training (PMINT) in Onslow Bay.

January 26, 2001 USS Carter Hall pulled into Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands, for a three-day visit to St. Thomas Island.

From Jan. 31 through Feb. 13, LSD 50 was underway in the Cherry Point Op. Area for MEUEX 12 Returned home on Feb. 15 Underway for Material Inspection on Feb. 27 Underway for SACEX/SOCEX from March 9-28 Inport Mayport from March 12-14.

April 25, USS Carter Hall departed homeport for a scheduled Mediterranean deployment with the USS Kearsarge ARG and 24th MEU.

May 9, The dock landing ship pulled into Rota, Spain, for a two-day port call Port visit to Palma de Mallorca, Spain, from May 14-18 Participated in exercise Trident D'or, south of Sardinia, from May 21-31 and Alexander the Great, in the Aegean Sea, from June 5-15.

June 18, The Carter Hall moored at Aksaz naval base for a four-day visit to Marmaris, Turkey Port call to Limassol, Cyprus, from June 25-28.

July 4, LSD 50 pulled into Bari, Italy, for a three-day port call before participating in Albanian Amphibious Landing Exercise (PHIBLEX) from July 7-13.

July 16, USS Carter Hall pulled into Souda Bay, Crete, for a week-long port call Port visit to Rhodes, Greece, from July 24-27.

August 2, USS Carter Hall pulled into Rijeka, Croatia, for a 12-day Fleet Maintenance Availability (FMAV) Port call to Toulon, France, from Aug. 17-21 Inport Barcelona, Spain, from Aug. 22-25 Port call to Gaeta, Italy, from Aug. 27-31.

September 3, The Carter Hall arrived in Koper, Slovenia, for a four-day port visit.

September 22, The dock landing ship pulled into Rota, Spain, for a four-day port call to conduct agricultural washdowns Anchored in Onslow Bay for offload on Oct. 14.

October 15, USS Carter Hall returned to Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek after a six-month deployment.

From Dec. 3-12, LSD 50 was underway for routine training Inport Naval Station Mayport from Dec. 5-9.

February 12, 2002 Cmdr. Troy L. Hart relieved Cmdr. Edward J. Delaney as the 5th CO of Carter Hall.

March 4, 2003 USS Carter Hall departed Little Creek for a scheduled deployment, with the USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Amphibious Ready Group and the 26th MEU, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

October 1, USS Carter Hall pulled into Naval Station Rota, Spain, after spending two months off the coast of Liberia, providing peacekeeping support in the Capital city of Monrovia. The ships moored in Rota to conduct an equipment wash-down, and take some much-needed liberty before getting underway.

October 24, USS Carter Hall, commanded by Cmdr. Brian D. Peterson, returned to homeport after a nearly eight-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR. The ARG's support of operations in Iraq was cut short in August, when they were ordered to transit to Monrovia, Liberia, to support peacekeeping efforts. Once there, the 26th MEU/SOC provided a stabilizing presence, which allowed multinational forces from other western African countries to come in and handle the problem so humanitarian operations could be conducted. Elements of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit began to land in Monrovia on August 14. This was a Quick Reaction Force, comprised of Marines from the 1st Battalion, 8th Reg.

May 5, 2005 The Carter Hall departed NAB Little Creek for approximately one-month underway period, with the USS Nassau (LHA 4) ESG, to the U.S. Southern Command AoR in support of exercise New Horizons (NH) in Haiti. New Horizons began in February when USS Saipan (LHA 2) delivered task force personnel and equipment to the Caribbean island. The task force involved nearly 1,000 Sailors, Soldiers, Marines and Airmen. With NH concluding, Nassau ESG was called upon to support the recovery of forces and equipment. Upon arrival in Haiti, it will load and transport assets back to the home stations for detachments of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 1 (Gulfport, Miss.) the 699th Engineering Company (Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico) and the 640th Water Purification Unit (U.S. Virgin Islands).

August 17, LSD 50 is currently underway for Expeditionary Strike Group Exercise (ESGEX), one of its final underway-training exercises where Sailors and Marines train together in preparation for an upcoming deployment.

November 5, USS Carter Hall departed Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek for a scheduled deployment, with the USS Nassau Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 8 and the 22nd MEU, in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

April 9, 2006 The Carter Hall transited through the Suez Canal, marking the end of more than four months of maritime security operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet AoR. After arriving in the Arabian Gulf, the amphibious ships of the strike group completed the offload of the 22nd MEU in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Once in Iraq, the 22nd MEU (SOC) established its combat operations center near the ancient city of Hit along the Euphrates River. The MEU remained on station in Iraq for nearly 60 days.

April 11, USS Carter Hall pulled into Split, Croatia, for a week-long port visit The dock landing ship departed Marseille, France, after brief port call on April 21.

May 4, USS Carter Hall returned to homeport after a six-month deployment.

September 28, The dock landing ship transited from NAB Little Creek to Earl Industries, LLC shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a scheduled maintenance.

December 21, 2006 Cmdr. James E. McGover relieved Cmdr. Frank S. Linkous as commanding officer of LSD 50.

February 15, 2007 USS Carter Hall arrived in Galveston, Texas, to take part in the Galveston Navy Week festivities.

April 10, USS Carter Hall departed homeport for a six-month independent deployment to the U.S. European Command and Central Command Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

June 8, The Carter Hall, along with the RFA Fort Austin (A 386) and FGS Koln (F 211), is currently conducting Maritime Security Operations (MSO) in the Arabian Gulf, as part of Combined Task Force (CTF) 150.

March 9, 2008 LSD 50 is currently undergoing an operational evaluation with elements of the 26th MEU in the Atlantic Ocean.

April 28, The dock landing ship pulled into Port Everglades, Fla., for a Fleet Week.

June 27, Cmdr. Jeffrey W. Sinclair relieved Cmdr. James E. McGover as CO of USS Carter Hall.

August 26, USS Carter Hall departed Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek for a scheduled deployment, as part of the USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Expeditionary Strike Group.

September 17, LSD 50 recently departed Marseille, France, after a scheduled port visit.

September 22, The Carter Hall departed Rhodes, Greece, after a four-day port call.

October 12, The dock landing ship recently anchored off Kuwait Naval Base to offload Marines and equipment from the 26th MEU.

November 1, USS Carter Hall is currently serving as an Afloat Forward Staging Base (AFSB) in the North Arabian Gulf, as part of Combined Task Force (CTF) 158.

December 9, USS Carter Hall departed Manama, Bahrain, after a routine port visit.

February 27, 2009 LSD 50 transited the Suez Canal northbound after concluding operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet AoR. The ship backloaded Marined off KNB in mid-February.

March 5, The Carter Hall departed Antalya, Tyrkey, after a three-day port visit Moored at Naval Station Rota for agricultural washdowns from March 10-14.

March 27, USS Carter Hall returned to homeport after a seven-month deployment.

January 14, 2010 USS Carter Hall departed Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, as part of the USS Bataan (LHD 5) ARG, to provide humanitarian assistance to Haiti.

January 24, The dock landing ship pulled into Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to onload more than 400 pallets of humanitarian aid and supplies.

March 1, The Carter Hall arrived at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, for an agricultural wash-down of the ship's equipment, concluding its participation in the joint humanitarian assistance mission Operation Unified Response. The Carter Hall delivered 1,100 pallets of food and water, 5,000 cots, and 338 tents during its service off Haiti Returned home on March 8.

June 23, Cmdr. George B. Doyon, Jr., relieved Cmdr. Jeffrey W. Sinclair as the 10th CO of Carter Hall.

July 8, USS Carter Hall is currently underway for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), as part of the Kearsarge (LHD 3) Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), in preparation for the upcoming deployment later this year.

August 27, USS Carter Hall departed Little Creek for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

October 8, The dock landing ship departed Manama, Bahrain, after a five-day port call.

November 1, The Carter Hall is currently participating in an amphibious training exercise off the coast of Djibouti.

January 2, 2011 LSD 50 provided medical assistance to an Indian crew member of a fishing vessel in the Arabian Gulf.

April 13, The Carter Hall completed its U.S. 5th Fleet tasking and entered the U.S. 6th Fleet to support NATO-led Operation Unified Protector Moored at Naval Station Rota, Spain, from April 30- May 3.

May 16, USS Carter Hall returned to homeport after a nearly nine-month deployment.

June 24, Cmdr. Damon K. Amaral relieved Cmdr. George B. Doyon, Jr., as CO of the Carter Hall during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

July 2, 2012 The Carter Hall anchored off Bristol, R.I., for a scheduled port visit to participate in 4th of July celebration.

July 7, USS Carter Hall moored at State Pier in New London, Conn., for a two-day port visit to participate in Operation Sail (OpSail) 2012 festivities.

October 31, The Carter Hall departed Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story to provide Navy relief to areas affected by Hurricane Sandy, if required Anchored in New York Harbor on Nov. 2 Returned home on Nov. 12.

November 16, Cmdr. Gregory D. Blyden relieved Cmdr. Damon K. Amaral as commanding officer of the USS Carter Hall.

December 12, Seaman Darian A. Drouin died Wednesday night from injuries sustained from a fall in the ship's well deck, while the Carter Hall was underway off the coast of North Carolina, participating in Group Sail operations with the USS Bataan.

January 22, 2013 LSD 50 departed homeport for an Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 4/Marine Expeditionary Unit Integration Training (PMINT) and COMPTUEX, with the USS Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group and 26th MEU.

March 11, USS Carter Hall departed Little Creek for a scheduled deployment after a three-day delay due to bad weather Inport Morehead City, N.C., on March 12.

March 30, The dock landing ship arrived in Corfu, Greece, for a four-day port visit Transited the Suez Canal southbound on April 5.

May 4, USS Carter Hall backloaded 200 Marines off the coast of Oman after participated in a two-week joint exercise Sea Soldier.

May 18, The Carter Hall moored at Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai.

June 6, LSD 50 recently arrived in the Gulf of Aqaba to offload Marines and equipment in Jordan for participation in annual exercise Eager Lion 2013 Moored at Aqaba Naval Base for backload on June 21.

July 19, The Carter Hall recently departed Bahrain after a routine port call.

August 7, USS Carter Hall backloaded sailors and Marines from the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), while anchored off Arta Beach, after a week-long sustainment unilateral exercise in Djibouti.

August 25, The dock landing ship pulled into Port Victoria, Seychelles, for a scheduled port visit.

September 23, USS Carter Hall anchored off Kuwait Naval Base to conduct agricultural counter-measure washdowns Backload from Sept. 28-29 Returned to Mediterranean on Oct. 12.

October 17, LSD 50 moored at La Spezia naval base for a four-day port visit to Italy Inport Naval Station Rota, Spain, from Oct. 24-27.?

November 7, USS Carter Hall returned to homeport after an extended eight-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

December 26, The General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard (ex-Metro Machine), Norfolk, Va., was awarded a $172 million modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-09-C-4416) for the USS Carter Hall's Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (E-DSRA). Work is expected to be completed by April 2015.

January 23, 2014 USS Carter Hall entered the Speede Dry Dock at the General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard in Norfolk.

May 30, Cmdr. Neal H. Brinn relieved Cmdr. Gregory D. Blyden as the 13th CO of Carter Hall.

October 2?, The dock landing ship undocked and moored pierside at NASSCO shipyard.

August 7, 2015 Cmdr. Christina L. Dalmau relieved Cmdr. Neal H. Brinn as CO of the USS Carter Hall during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at NASSCO shipyard.

November 1?, The Carter Hall departed Quay Wall Dogleg Berth for sea trials, following an extended 22-month availability.

February 15, 2016 USS Carter Hall rescued three fishermen from a sinking MFV Capt. David after responding to a distress call, about 60 miles off the coast of Virginia, while underway for a routine training.

March 16, LSD 50 returned to Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story after underway for a routine training.

April 9, A Sailor was reported missing at approximately 4.20 p.m. while the Carter Hall was underway off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, in support of the Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) CSG's Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

April 12, The search for a missing Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Taylor KayJean Machado was suspended today and she was pronounced dead.

May 1?, USS Carter Hall departed homeport to participate in annual multinational exercise Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) Anchored in Onslow Bay to embark the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment.

June 2, The Carter Hall moored at Quay 32, Coal Terminal in Muuga Harbour, Maardu, Estonia, for a three-day port visit to Tallinn before participating in at-sea phase of BALTOPS 2016.

June 17, USS Carter Hall moored at Scheer-Mole, Tirpitzhafen Naval Base in Kiel, Germany, for a three-day port visit to participate in annual Kiel Week celebration.

June 21, USS Carter Hall moored at Vlothaven Quay in Port of Amsterdam, Netherlands, for a three-day visit in support of Maritime/Air Systems and Technologies (MAST) conference.

June 26, The dock landing ship moored at Haakonsvern Naval Base in Bergen, Norway, for a two-day port visit.

July 1, The Carter Hall moored at Skarfabakki Quay, New Harbour in Reykjavik, Iceland, for a three-day liberty port visit Returned to Little Creek on July 1?.

August 26, USS Carter Hall hosted a "Gator Cruise" for friends and family members while moored at Pier 16N, Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story.

October 2?, LSD 50 departed homeport for a day-long underway to conduct Mid-Cycle Inspection (MCI) assessment with the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV).

November 7, Cmdr. Timothy R. Carter relieved Cmdr. Christina L. Dalmau as the 15th CO of Carter Hall during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story.

November 29, USS Carter Hall departed Little Creek for a 19-day underway to participate in ARG/MEUEX, as part of the USS Bataan (LHD 5) Amphibious Ready Group.

January 9, 2017 The Carter Hall departed Quay Wall West for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Moored at Berth 5, General Cargo Terminal in Port of Morehead City, N.C., for onload from Jan. 12-13 Moored at Wharf C1 on Naval Station Mayport, Fla., from Jan. 22-24 Anchored in Onslow Bay for offload on Jan. 27 Moored at Quay Wall East on Jan. 29.

February 25, USS Carter Hall departed Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story for a scheduled deployment.

February 27, The Carter Hall moored at Berth 6, General Cargo Terminal in Port of Morehead City, N.C., for a two-day onload Moved to Berth 7 on Feb. 28 Transited the Strait of Gibraltar on March 9.

From March 12-13, USS Carter Hall conducted deck landing qualifications with the U.S. Air Force's CV-22 Osprey, assigned to the 7th Special Operations Squadron (SOS), 352nd SOW, while underway in the Ionian Sea.

March 14, LSD 50 moored at West Berth K14, NATO Fuel Depot in Souda Bay, Crete, for a two-day port call Transited the Bosporus Strait on March 17.

From March 18-21, the Carter Hall participated in a joint amphibious landing exercise Spring Storm 17, off the coast of Cape Midia, Romania Departed Black Sea on March 22 Transited the Suez Canal on March 26.

From April 5-6, USS Carter Hall conducted offload of vechiles and equipment at Arta Beach, Djibouti, for a two-week amphibious exercise Alligator Dagger, as part of the sustainment training with the French 5th Overseas Combined Arms Regiment (RIAOM).

May 5, The Carter Hall moored at Jordanian Naval Base, south of Aqaba, for a two-day port call to conduct offload in support of the annual multinational exercise Eager Lion.

June 12, The dock landing ship moored at General Cargo Terminal in Port of Duqm, Oman, for a week-long upkeep.

July 3, USS Carter Hall moored at Berth 2, Sultan Qaboos Port in Muscat, Oman, for a four-day liberty visit to celebrate the Independence Day.

August 20, The Carter Hall moored at Aqaba Naval Base, Jordan, for a five-day port call to conduct agricultural counter-measure washdowns Transited the Suez Canal on Aug. 27.

August 29, USS Carter Hall moored at Kolossos Berth in Akantia Harbour for a four-day liberty port visit to Rhodes, Greece Moored at Milhaud Pier 5W in Toulon Naval Base, France, from Sept. 7-11 Transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound on Sept. 13.

September 22, USS Carter Hall moored at Berth 6, Pier 9 on Naval Station Norfolk following a seven-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

November 5, The Carter Hall recently moored at Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Va., for ammo offload Moored at Quay Wall Dogleg Berth in Little Creek on Nov. 9 Underway in the Cherry Point Op. Area from Nov. 14-18 Underway off the coast of Virginia from Nov. 27-30.

December 10, LSD 50 moored at Pier 16N on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story after a six-day underway in the VACAPES Op. Area.

January 22, 2018 USS Carter Hall moored at Pier 1, General Dynamics NASSCO-Earl Industries shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a maintenance availability.

June 1, Cmdr. Brian K. Hamel relieved Cmdr. Timothy R. Carter as CO of the Carter Hall during a change-of-command ceremony at Earl Industries shipyard.

August 10, Cmdr. Bruce W. Golden relieved Cmdr. Brian K. Hamel as the 17th CO of Carter Hall during a change-of-command ceremony at Earl Industries shipyard.

November 7, USS Carter Hall moved "dead-stick" from Earl Industries shipyard to Quay Wall Dogleg Berth on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story.

February 4, 2019 The Carter Hall moored at Quay Wall Dogleg Berth after a five-day underway for sea trials Underway again on Feb. 26 Moored at Quay Wall East on March ? Underway for routine training from April 8-12 and April 26- May 3.

June 3, USS Carter Hall moored at Berth 6, Pier 11 on Naval Station Norfolk for a training availability (TRAV) Underway for Career Orientation Training for Midshipmen (CORTRAMID) summer cruise on July 20 Moored at Quay Wall Dogleg Berth on July 2?.

August 4, USS Carter Hall departed homeport to participate in the Atlantic phase of a multinational exercise UNITAS LX.

August 18, The Carter Hall anchored off Brazilian naval base on Mocangue Island Large in Niteroi for a scheduled port visit to Rio de Janeiro Moored pierside at Mocangue Naval Base on Aug. 19 Underway for at-sea phase of UNITAS on Aug. 22 Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) on Aug. 24 Anchored at Sepetiba Bay on Aug. 26 Conducted amphibious landing at Ilha da Marambaia on Aug. 27.

September 23, USS Carter Hall moored at Quay Wall Dogleg Berth on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story.

September 26, Cmdr. Matthew R. Shellock relieved Cmdr. Bruce W. Golden as CO of the Carter Hall during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

October 22, The Carter Hall departed Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story for routine training in the Cherry Point and Virginia Capes Op. Areas Returned home in late October Underway again on Nov. 6.

November 8, USS Carter Hall moored at Homeport Pier in Stapleton, Staten Island, N.Y., for a four-day port visit to participate in Veterans Week New York City Returned home on Nov. 15 Underway again from Nov. 25-26 and Jan. 2?.

January 24, 2020 The Carter Hall moored at Wharf B2 on Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for a five-day port visit in support of exercise Trident 20-2 Conducted operations approximatelly 20 n.m. off the coast of St. Augustine, Fla., on Jan. 30 and Feb. 1 Arrived off the coast of North Carolina on Feb. 3.

From February 11-12, the Carter Hall conducted operations off the coast of Virginia Moored at Quay Wall East on Feb. 13 Underway for Type Commander's Amphibious Training (TCAT), in the Cherry Point Op. Area, on March 13 Moored at Berth 6, Pier 6 in Naval Station Norfolk on March 23 Moved to Quay Wall East on March 31 Underway again from April 20- May 1 and June 15.

June 19, USS Carter Hall moored at Berth 5, Pier 2 on Naval Station Norfolk Underway again on Aug. 10.

August 12, The Carter Hall moored at Pier 16N on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story Underway for ammo onload at the NWS Yorktown on Aug. 17 Returned home on Aug. ?.

August 28, The Carter Hall moored at Berth 5, Pier 2 on Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway for routine training Underway for Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) exercise, as part of the USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) ARG, on Oct. 9.

October 19, LSD 50 conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Kanawha (T-AO 196), while underway in the Virginia Capes Op. Area Arrived in Onslow Bay to participate in Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 4/Marine Expeditionary Unit Integration Training (PMINT), with the 24th MEU, on Oct. 22 Moored at Berth 9, General Cargo Terminal in Port of Morehead City for onload from Oct. 23-24.

November 2, The Carter Hall moored at Pier 16S on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story Underway for ARG/MEUEX on Dec. 2 Moored at Berth 9, General Cargo Terminal in Port of Morehead City from Dec. 4-5 Moored at Quay Wall East on Dec. 16.

January 21, 2021 Cmdr. LaDonna M. Simpson relieved Cmdr. Matthew R. Shellock as CO of the Carter Hall during a change-of-command ceremony in the ship's pilot house.

February 21, USS Carter Hall departed homeport for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), in the Cherry Point, Charleston and Jacksonville Op. Areas Moored at Berth 9 in Port of Morehead City for onload from Feb. 22-23 Moored at Berth 5, Pier 10 in Naval Station Norfolk on March 18.

March 25, USS Carter Hall departed Norfolk for a scheduled deployment, as part of the USS Iwo Jima ARG.

April 3, The Carter Hall conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply (T-AOE 6), while underway in the eastern Atlantic Ocean Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again, while underway in the Celtic Sea, on April 12 Moored at Wharf 14, Her Majesty's Naval Base (HMNB) Devonport in Plymouth, England, from April 17-26 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply on April 27.

April 30, USS Carter Hall moored at Rocha Conde d'Obidos Cruise Terminal in Lisbon, Portugal, for a three-day port visit Participated in a multinational exercise Contex-Phibex 21, in the Setubal Bay, from May 3-13 Moored at Berth 2/3, Pier 1 on Naval Station Rota, Spain, from May 17-21 Transited the Strait of Gibraltar eastbound on May 22 Transited the Strait of Sicily on May 25 Arrived off the north coast of Crete on May 27.

May 28, USS Carter Hall moored at Berth K12, East Refueling Wharf in Souda Bay, Greece, for a two-day port call Transited the Suez Canal southbound on June 1 Transited the Strait of Tiran northbound, just before midnight, on June 2.

June 3, The Carter Hall moored at Aqaba Naval Base, Jordan, for a three-day port call to offload vehicles and equipment in support of sustainment training exercises.


Mục lục

Sau khi Hiệp ước Hải quân London năm 1930 được phê chuẩn, Hải quân Hoa Kỳ quan tâm trở lại đến tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ trang bị pháo 6 in (150 mm), một phần là do sự than phiền của hạm đội về tốc độ bắn chậm của cỡ pháo 8 in (200 mm), chỉ được 3 phát mỗi phút so với tốc độ 10 phát mỗi phút của pháo 6-inch. [3] Vào lúc đó Hải quân Hoa Kỳ bắt đầu áp dụng máy bay không người lái như mục tiêu để thực hành phòng không, vốn có thể mô phỏng cả máy bay ném bom bổ nhào lẫn máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi. Kết quả thực hành mô phỏng đã gây bất an cho hạm đội, vì nếu không có bộ điều khiển hỏa lực và máy tính, tàu chiến của hạm đội hầu như vô vọng trong việc chống đỡ mật độ không kích của đối phương được dự dự báo trong tương lai. Chỉ riêng máy tính cơ học có thể nặng đến 10 tấn và phải bố trí tại các tầng hầm để cân bằng trọng lượng và được bảo vệ thỏa đáng. [4]

Như thực tế của Thế Chiến II đã chỉ ra, các dự đoán trước chiến tranh tỏ ra lạc quan. Cuối cùng mọi khẩu đội phòng không với cỡ nòng lớn hơn 20 mm đều được vận hành điện và ngắm mục tiêu bằng bộ điều khiển hỏa lực và radar. [5]

Lúc thiết kế, lớp Cleveland đã có sự phân bố trọng lượng khá chặt chẻ, nhưng những yêu cầu mở rộng thêm chiều rộng mạn tàu đều bị từ chối vì sẻ làm giảm tiến độ đóng tàu. [5] Nhằm trang bị các bộ điều khiển hỏa lực và radar mới nặng hơn trong phạm vi trọng lượng choán nước của một tàu tuần dương, tháp pháo số 3 được loại bỏ. Điều này cũng cho phép có thêm chỗ để mở rộng cầu tàu để có được một trung tâm thông tin tác chiến mới cùng các bộ radar cần thiết, và còn dư tải trọng cho phép trang bị thêm hai khẩu đội pháo đa dụng 5 in (130 mm)/38 caliber nòng đôi phía trước và phía sau cấu trúc thượng tầng, có được một góc bắn rộng.

Cho dù kém hơn ba nòng pháo 6-inch so với những chiếc lớp Brooklyn và lớp phụ St. Louis dẫn trước, hệ thống kiểm soát hỏa lực mới và tiên tiến hơn giúp cho lớp Cleveland có được ưu thế về hỏa lực trong chiến đấu thực tế. Tuy nhiên việc tăng cường thêm dàn hỏa lực phòng không hạng nhẹ cho đến cuối Thế Chiến II khiến các con tàu bị nặng đầu. Để bù trừ trọng lượng tăng thêm, một số con tàu đã tháo dỡ máy phóng cùng với máy đo tầm xa trên tháp pháo số 1. [6] Vấn đề nặng đầu của lớp tàu ảnh hưởng nặng đến mức mọi bổ sung về thiết bị đều phải đi kèm với việc tháo dỡ một trọng lượng tương đương. Trong vài trường hợp, việc trang bị radar dẫn đường tuần tra chiến đấu trên không đã đưa đến việc tháo dỡ phòng đạn pháo 20 mm. [3]

Các phiên bản cải tiến Sửa đổi

Có tổng cộng 52 chiếc thuộc lớp này đã được vạch kế hoạch và 3 chiếc bị hủy bỏ. Chín chiếc đã được đặt hàng lại như những tàu sân bay hạng nhẹ lớp Independence, và 13 chiếc được thay đổi (nhưng chỉ có hai chiếc hoàn tất) sang một thiết kế hơi khác biệt, với một cấu trúc thượng tầng gọn gàng hơn và một ống khói duy nhất, được biết đến như là lớp tàu tuần dương Fargo. Trong số 27 chiếc lớp Cleveland được đưa vào hoạt động, một chiếc (USS Galveston) được hoàn tất như một tàu tuần dương tên lửa điều khiển và năm chiếc sau đó được cải biến thành những chiếc loại này thuộc các lớp GalvestonProvidence hai trong mỗi lớp tàu tuần dương tên lửa điều khiển này có phần cấu trúc thượng tầng được mở rộng để phục vụ trong vai trò soái hạm. Theo thông lệ về cách đặt tên tàu chiến của Hải quân Mỹ vào lúc đó, tất cả các con tàu đều được đặt tên theo những thành phố của Hoa Kỳ. [7]

Lớp tàu tuần dương Cleveland đã phục vụ chủ yếu tại Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai, đặc biệt là cùng các đội đặc nhiệm tàu sân bay nhanh nhưng một số cũng đã hoạt động tại Châu Âu và Bắc Phi trong thành phần Hạm đội Đại Tây Dương. Cho dù đã hoạt động tích cực và một số bị hư hại, tất cả đều đã sống sót qua chiến tranh. Cho đến năm 1950, tất cả đều được cho xuất biên chế, ngoại trừ Manchester được giữ lại phục vụ cho đến năm 1956. Sáu chiếc sau đó được hoàn tất hay cải biến thành tàu tuần dương tên lửa điều khiển. Lớp Cleveland tiếp tục bị ảnh hưởng của trọng lượng nặng đầu do vũ khí phòng không và radar được bổ sung trong chiến tranh không có chiếc tàu tái ngũ trong cuộc Chiến tranh Triều Tiên chúng đòi hỏi một thành phần thủy thủ đoàn gần bằng một chiếc lớp Baltimore, nên những chiếc này được huy động thay thế. Những chiếc không cải biến bắt đầu được bán để tháo dỡ từ năm 1959.

Những chiếc được hoàn tất hay cải biến thành tàu tuần dương tên lửa điều khiển tái biên chế vào giữa những năm 1950 và nghỉ hưu vào đầu những năm 1970. Tất cả, đặc biệt là những chiếc trang bị tên lửa phòng không Talos, lại phải chịu đựng vấn đề trọng lượng nặng đầu nặng nề hơn thiết kế ban đầu do những thiết bị radar bổ sung. Vấn đề đặc biệt nghiêm trọng đối với chiếc Galveston, khiến nó buộc phải xuất biên chế sớm vào năm 1970. Oklahoma CityLittle Rock đã cần có những đồ dằn trong lườn tàu và thay đổi cách sắp xếp bên trong để cho phép chúng tiếp tục phục vụ trong thập niên 1970. Chiếc cuối cùng, Oklahoma City, được cho xuất biên chế vào tháng 12, 1979.

Tàu được bảo tồn Sửa đổi

Chỉ có một chiếc tàu tuần dương trong lớp Cleveland được bảo tồn. Chiếc Little Rock, tái trang bị năm 1960 thành một tàu tuần dương tên lửa điều khiển lớp Galveston và mang ký hiệu lườn CLG-4 (sau thành CG-4), hiện là một tàu bảo tàng tại Buffalo, New York, bên cạnh The Sullivans, một tàu khu trục lớp Fletcher, và Croaker, một tàu ngầm lớp Gato. [8]


The Rebels, Led by Cinqué, First Targeted the Cook 

Despite being from at least nine different ethnic groups, the Africans agreed one night to band together in revolt. 

Before dawn on July 2, they either broke or picked the locks on their chains. Led by Cinqué, a rice farmer also known as Joseph Cinqué or Sengbe Pieh, they then climbed up to the main deck, headed straight for the cook and bludgeoned him to death in his sleep. Though awakened by the tumult, the other four crew members, plus Ruiz and Montes, didn’t have time to load their guns. Grabbing a dagger and a club, the captain managed to kill one African and mortally wound another. But he was eventually slashed to death with cane knives the Africans had found in the ship’s hold. Two other crew members threw a canoe overboard and jumped into the water after it, whereas the cabin boy stayed out of the fighting altogether. Ruiz and Montes, meanwhile, were relieved of their weapons, tied up and ordered to sail back to Sierra Leone.

Having all grown up away from the ocean, the Africans depended on Ruiz and Montes for navigation. During the day, the two Spaniards set an eastward course, as they had been told to do. At night, however, they headed north and west in the hope of being rescued. 

After passing through the Bahamas, where the Amistad stopped on various small islands, it moved up the coast of the United States. News reports began to appear of a mysterious schooner, with an all-Black crew and tattered sails, steering erratically. With little to drink onboard, dehydration and dysentery took a toll, and several Africans died. Finally, on August 26, a U.S. Navy brig ran into the Amistad off the eastern end of Long Island. Ruiz and Montes were freed at once, while the Africans were imprisoned in Connecticut, which, unlike New York, was still a slave state at the time.

Sengbe Pieh, also known as Joseph Cinque


Anne Frank&aposs Death

On August 4, 1944, after 25 months in hiding, Anne Frank and the seven others in the Secret Annex were discovered by the Gestapo, the German secret state police, who had learned about the hiding place from an anonymous tipster (who has never been definitively identified).

After their arrest, the Franks, Van Pels and Fritz Pfeffer were sent by the Gestapo to Westerbork, a holding camp in the northern Netherlands. From there, in September 1944, the group was transported by freight train to the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination and concentration camp complex in German-occupied Poland. Anne and Margot Frank were spared immediate death in the Auschwitz gas chambers and instead were sent to Bergen-Belsen, a concentration camp in northern Germany. In February 1945, the Frank sisters died of typhus at Bergen-Belsen their bodies were thrown into a mass grave. Several weeks later, on April 15, 1945, British forces liberated the camp.

Edith Frank died of starvation at Auschwitz in January 1945. Hermann van Pels died in the gas chambers at Auschwitz soon after his arrival there in 1944 his wife is believed to have likely died at the Theresienstadt concentration camp in what is now the Czech Republic in the spring of 1945. Peter van Pels died at the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria in May 1945. Fritz Pfeffer died from illness in late December 1944 at the Neuengamme concentration camp in Germany. Anne Frank’s father, Otto, was the only member of the group to survive he was liberated from Auschwitz by Soviet troops on January 27, 1945.


Close Call

On his first combat mission, Ladley was in flying formation as a wingman, fixing his eyes on the flight leader.

&ldquoAll of a sudden, up out of the ocean comes this ship with a lot of anti-aircraft fire, which we dove through and bombed and strafed,&rdquo he said.

One of the American pilots dropped a bomb too low and caught shrapnel. All of the other Hellcats immediately flew back to the aircraft carrier, Ladley said.

Later during the deployment, Ladley crash-landed his plane on the deck, careening into the ocean. He was picked up by a plane guard destroyer and was transferred to Langley by a high line.

Langley returned to the continental U.S. in October 1944, when Ladley took advantage of the brief reprieve by picking up his fiancé Amy Reichert in Los Angeles and driving to Yuma, Ariz., to get married.

In May 1945, Ladley&rsquos squadron was called back, deploying aboard USS Cabot from Hawaii to the Pacific Theater. Ladley flew air strikes over Wake Island, North Korea, and Manchuria.


Mục lục

Thiết kế Sửa đổi

Lớp Cleveland được thiết kế nhằm mục đích gia tăng tầm xa hoạt động, tăng cường hỏa lực phòng không và sự bảo vệ chống ngư lôi so với các tàu tuần dương Hoa Kỳ trước đây. Cho dù kém hơn ba nòng pháo 6-inch so với những chiếc lớp Brooklyn dẫn trước, hệ thống kiểm soát hỏa lực mới và tiên tiến hơn giúp cho lớp Cleveland có được ưu thế về hỏa lực trong chiến đấu thực tế. Tuy nhiên việc tăng cường thêm dàn hỏa lực phòng không hạng nhẹ cho đến cuối Thế Chiến II khiến các con tàu bị nặng đầu đáng kể. [1]

Chế tạo Sửa đổi

Amsterdam được đặt lườn vào ngày 3 tháng 3 năm 1943 tại xưởng tàu của hãng Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company tại Newport News, Virginia. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 25 tháng 4 năm 1944, được đỡ đầu bởi Bà William E. Hasenfuss (người "Mẹ Sao vàng" đầu tiên của thành phố Amsterdam, New York, vốn bị mất người con William E. Hasenfuss, Jr. khi Nhật Bản tấn công Trân Châu Cảng), và được đưa ra hoạt động tại Xưởng hải quân Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia vào ngày 8 tháng 1 năm 1945 dưới quyền chỉ huy của hạm trưởng, Đại tá Hải quân Andrew P. Lawton. [2] [3]

Sau khi hoàn tất việc trang bị tại Norfolk, Virginia, Amsterdam lên đường vào ngày 5 tháng 2 cho chuyến đi chạy thử máy tại vịnh Chesapeake. Vào ngày 17 tháng 2, chiếc tàu tuần dương khởi hành từ Hampton Roads hướng đến Trinidad cho giai đoạn hai của việc chạy thử máy. Nó hoạt động tại Trinidad cho đến ngày 13 tháng 3, khi nó lên đường quay trở lại Norfolk. Trên đường đi, nó thực hành bắn phá bờ biển ngoài khơi đảo Culebra, và về đến Norfolk vào ngày 20 tháng 3. Sau một chuyến đi ngắn đến mũi May, New Jersey để thực hành tác xạ, nó trở vào Xưởng hải quân Norfolk vào ngày 24 tháng 3 để đại tu. [2]

Amsterdam rời xưởng tàu vào ngày 20 tháng 4 cho các cuộc thực tập huấn luyện tại vịnh Chesapeake, rồi lên đường bốn ngày sau đó hướng đến vùng biển Caribbe. Nó tiến hành các cuộc thực tập huấn luyện ngoài khơi Culebra và tại vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba rồi tiếp tục đi đến kênh đào Panama và băng qua vào ngày 5 tháng 5. Chiếc tàu tuần dương đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 18 tháng 5, và đã tiến hành nhiều cuộc thực hành tác xạ và huấn luyện trong thời gian lưu lại vùng biển Hawaii. [2]

Vào ngày 9 tháng 6, chiếc tàu tuần dương lên đường hướng sang đảo Leyte thuộc Philippines. Sau khi đi đến vịnh San Pedro vào ngày 21 tháng 6, nó trình diện để nhận nhiệm vụ cùng Đệ Tam hạm đội và sau khi được tiếp tế và tiếp nhiên liệu, nó khởi hành cùng với Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38 vào ngày 1 tháng 7 để hộ tống cho các cuộc không kích xuống chính quốc Nhật Bản. Ngày 10 tháng 7, máy bay của lực lượng đặc nhiệm bắt đầu một loạt các cuộc không kích nhắm vào sân bay, nhà máy và tàu bè Nhật trong số các mục tiêu của chúng có Tokyo, Kure, Kobe và Osaka. Trong chiến dịch này, Amsterdam bảo vệ cho các tàu sân bay khỏi các cuộc tấn công của máy bay và lực lượng mặt biển đối phương. Ngày 15 tháng 8, Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38 chuẩn bị tung ra một cuộc không kích khác xuống Tokyo khi họ nhận được tin Nhật Bản đã chấp nhận đầu hàng giúp kết thúc cuộc xung đột. [2]

Trong vài tuần lễ tiếp theo, Amsterdam tiếp tục ở lại vùng biển ngoài khơi bờ biển phía Đông của đảo Honshū tuần tra đề phòng bất trắc trong quá trình thương lượng ngừng bắn. Nó tiến vào vịnh Tokyo vào ngày 5 tháng 9 và ở lại đây cho đến ngày 20 tháng 9 trước khi lên đường cho hành trình quay trở về Hoa Kỳ. Sau các chặng dừng ngắn tại vịnh Buckner, Okinawa và Trân Châu Cảng để nhận lên tàu cựu quân nhân hồi hương, con tàu về đến Portland, Oregon vào ngày 15 tháng 10 và ở lại đây hai tuần lễ để tham gia các lễ hội nhân ngày Hải quân. Chiếc tàu tuần dương lên đường đi San Pedro, California vào ngày 29 tháng 10. [2]

Amsterdam đến San Pedro vào ngày 1 tháng 11. Sau một giai đoạn bảo trì và nghỉ ngơi, nó rời vùng bờ Tây vào ngày 19 tháng 11 hướng đến Trân Châu Cảng. Đến nơi vào ngày 25 tháng 11, nó tiếp nhận nhân sự và thiết bị để vận chuyển trở về vùng bờ Tây lên đường vào ngày 12 tháng 12 và đến San Pedro vào ngày 18 tháng 12. Ngày 21 tháng 1 năm 1946, chiếc tàu tuần dương lên đường đi San Francisco. Không lâu sau khi đến nơi, thủy thủ đoàn của nó bắt đầu các công việc chuẩn bị để ngừng hoạt động. Amsterdam được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 30 tháng 6 năm 1947 và được đưa về Hạm đội Dự bị Thái Bình Dương tại San Francisco. Tên của nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 2 tháng 1 năm 1971, và con tàu bị bán cho hãng National Metal and Steel Corporation, đảo Terminal, California vào ngày 11 tháng 2 năm 1972 để tháo dỡ. [2] [3]

Amsterdam được tặng tưởng một Ngôi sao chiến trận cho thành tích hoạt động trong Thế Chiến II. [2] [3]


Watch the video: Warship Size Comparison (February 2023).

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